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Archive for the ‘gender’ Category

We, women’s rights organisations, movements and allies committed to advancing women’s human rights, come together to form the Gender and Trade Coalition in the firm belief that a feminist alliance on trade justice is required to address the pernicious impact of trade rules on women’s human rights and to produce informed policy responses addressing the structural causes of gendered human rights violations.

We welcome the increasing recognition from governments and institutions that trade and investment rules create gendered consequences. We are concerned, however, that common policy responses are simply designed to increase the numbers and role of women involved in the free flow of capital, resources, and labour. This approach positions women as instruments of trade growth, failing to address any adverse discriminatory and exploitative consequences of the global, rules based neoliberal order on women’s human rights. This is regardless of the significant role women play as producers, consumers, traders, workers, and principal providers of unpaid care.

The movements and organisations we represent recognise that the policies of austerity–trade liberalisation; finance, investment and labour deregulation; privatisation of public goods and services; and the constraints on public policy making and service delivery–produce devastating human rights outcomes for many of the world’s women.

We believe the guiding principles of the global economic order upon which trade and investment rules are built are fundamentally destructive for the advancement of women’s human rights. We recognise that neoliberalism, austerity, and trickle-down economics has failed around the world, yet the rules of this model are being cemented and deepened through trade and investment rules. We believe that the existential crises facing humanity–climate change, mass displacements and migration, obscene inequality and growing authoritarian, patriarchal governance–are linked to the global economic rules that have shaped the past forty years.

Trade rules constructed around principles of competition rather than solidarity, growth rather than human and sustainable development, consumption rather than conservation, individualism rather than public good, and market governance rather than participatory democracy cannot be the basis of a trade agenda that advances women’s human rights.

We believe that economic cooperation and multilateralism based on equitable, fair, sustainable, and gender-responsive principles can play a significant part in advancing women’s human rights. Global cooperation–rooted in principles of transparency, democracy and participation–that ensures capital contributes to the public goods and services necessary for the fulfilment of human rights is necessary. Global cooperation that redresses harm resulting from global trade supply chains is essential.

We believe that trade policies must affirm the primacy of governments’ human rights obligations under the UN Charter and international treaties and customary laws. Should trade policies diminish state capacity to meet human rights obligations, including the right to development, they must be modified.

We believe trade rules must not increase protections for multi-national corporations who are exerting a gigantic influence on trade policy making, avoiding taxes and accountability and exploiting labour, natural resources and personal data for their own profit maximisation. Trade rules must increase accountability of corporations who commit grave human rights violations, rather than provide corporations with unique recourse when judicial systems hold them accountable.

We believe trade policies should meet sustainable development needs of all countries, especially developing and Least-Developed countries, and the people including the women within these countries. Therefore trade policies must ensure the widest possible access to essential medicines, technologies and data and information, rather than restrict access. Trade policies should promote the sharing of seeds, resources and knowledge rather than penalising solidarity. Trade rules should expand and not limit governments’ capacities for broad-based and decent job creation based on living wages, especially for women. Trade rules should support governments to develop pro-poor policies and access to food including through the provision of food subsidies, public stockholdings and through providing preferential support to local, especially small-scale, women producers. We believe trade rules should support, not discourage, the growth of public spending on and ownership of public goods and services essential for human rights and the reduction and redistribution of women’s disproportionate burden of unpaid care work. These include food, water and sanitation, energy, infrastructure, transport, early childcare and education, healthcare services–rather than encourage privatisation.

We believe powerful vested interests should be prevented from influencing trade policies or providing financial support to political parties where they stand to benefit from the outcomes of trade negotiations. Instead trade policies should be developed democratically and facilitate informed participation in decision and consent processes by representative organizations of those most potentially impacted, such as women farmers, women workers, and Indigenous women.

We form this coalition to increase consciousness, capacity, research, and advocacy for trade and investment policies that facilitate a more equitable, socially just and sustainable global society in which all human rights and fundamental freedoms are actively promoted and can be fully enjoyed by all women.

 

Endorse the unity statement and join the Gender and Trade Coalition:
Read the unity statement here: bit.ly/JoinGenderTrade.The Gender and Trade Coalition is in formation, and all signatories are invited to share any analysis, experiences, and proposals to shape the coalition. Keep an eye out for future updates or email contact@gendertradecoalition.org directly to get involved.

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J’ai eu la chance de participer a une formation intensive, de plusieurs semaines, au debut à distance, puis en face a face, sur l’audit participatif du genre au ITC ILO a Geneve. Cela Grace , a la Commission Nationale pour La femme Libanaise (NCLW: Chequez notre site http://www.nclw.org.lb )

Qu’est ce que l’Audit du genre et a quoi sert il?

Deja l’audit est Participatif. On ne peut pas faire d’audit sans la cooperation de l’instance/ organisation / Institution / Companie auditee.

aussi, l’audit est une methode de recherche, j’en parle souvent dans mon cours de sociologie politique. Suite a la methode quantitative et qualitative on peut parler aussi de l’audit participatif, lie au genre, on essaye tout simplement de voir si dans diverses composantes de chaque instance, les droits , l’egalite et le genre sont respectes. Nous utilisons pour cela, tout comme dans les sciences sociales, si cheres a Durkheim , diverses sources pour les informations de l’audit.

on commence par une recherche litteraire ( en collectant via l’instance auditee, leur strategie, leur directives, des copies des mails addresses, les Termes de reference, leurs publications, leur organigram, leur circulaire et quelques decisions administratives, leurs agendas, et une panoplie de leurs programmes de formation. etc)

Plusieurs entretiens personnels peuvent aussi etre mis en place, avec des membres du personnel, des membres de l’administration, des experts techniques, meme avec l’equipe d’entretien ou bien avec les partenaires et les beneficiaires de l’instance auditee.

Les entretiens par groupe, les celebres focus groups , avec les equipes d’un meme programme, ou d’une meme branche.

Un Questionnaire peut etre aussi developpe, il aide a la comprehension des perceptions autour des questions du genre dans l’instance auditee (Banque, ministere, parti politique, universite, ONG, INGO, Donor….)

Suite a cela, plusieurs ateliers peuvent etre organises, ateliers interactifs ou les auditrices et auditeurs s’assurent des informations recues par les autres moyens, et des observations faites jusqu’a present.

Des Recommendations sont developpees, et generalement autour de 5 composantes de l’audit genre. (un autre billet a suivre autour du sujet)

La formation a l’ILO est interessante, elle permet de rencontrer sur un beau campus,  ou les ecureuils vivent dans les arbres et n’hesitent pas a se rapprocher de nous aux pauses cafes, des personnes differentes.

les “late night” discussions sont un plus, on “gazouille” en differentes langues et autour de sujets tellement diversifies!

a vous quelques photos du campus ….

a Suivre d’autres billets sur le sujet

Rita Chemaly

 

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“The document attached  on “Rural Women’s Right to Food & Nutrition” was drafted as a Submission for CSW 62. BUT, it is a powerful sustainable statement on the realities of women and food issues, and indeed, applies to all women, well beyond rural. It is intersectional with multiple rights of women and girls. It links to the economic, social, and cultural rights, civil and political rights, that are inclusive in gender equality and social justice.

the document has different parts:

I. The global food economy has been both gender-blind and male-biased.

II. The livelihoods of rural women producers are particularly under threat.

III. Rural women workers are employed in all sector of the rural economy, yet lack access to decent work.

IV. Sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are central in women’s RTFN

V. Indigenous women and girls are most vulnerable and marginalized in many countries of the world, where they make up an important part of the rural population.

VI. Women’s rights have been historically isolated from the human RTFN within legally-binding language of key international human rights treaties.

below are the main demands for achieving women’s right to food and nutrition:

VII. Demands for achieving rural women’s RTFN.
1. Guarantee rural women producers’ access, control, management and ownership of all natural and productive resources on which they depend.
2. Recognize and support rural women’s knowledge, culture, traditions and practices (in relation to agriculture, fisheries, forestry, livestock rearing and other food producing sectors) and their ecological understanding and sustainable practices should inform the management and conservation of resources.
3. Guarantee and implement decent work for rural women workers based on existing international instruments in a non-discriminatory manner.
4. Guarantee that systems are put in place to ensure that rural women who engage in domestic work are seen as significantly contributing to the economy and receive social security benefits.
5. Recognize the “intertwined subjectivities” of woman and child during pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding framed through the lens of women’s rights throughout their lifespan – especially women’s and girls’ rights to SRHR.
6. Introduce policies and laws that enable States to regulate and avoid any undue interference of for-profit or commercially-motivated non-state actors in rural women’s RTFN.
7. Guarantee the full implementation of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
8. Guarantee an adequate legal framework for the realization of rural women’s fundamental rights and freedoms based on the principles of equality and non-discrimination.
9. Ensure the independence and transparency of monitoring mechanisms in the context of the 2030 Agenda: these must be based on human rights, be free of any commercial or corporate undue influence and conflicts of interest, and ensure the full participation of the most affected by hunger and malnutrition, especially rural women.
10. Ensure the full realization of the RTFN of rural women within the framework of food sovereignty. ”

 

to read the full document, press the link below

CSW Written Submission _20171020

 

 

Rita Chemaly

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Un coup grave pour les femmes libanaises: la loi electorale de 2017 ne comprend pas de quota pour les femmes.

Alors que le Liban a une des pires places concernant la participation politique des  femmes au sein du parlement, un tout tout petit 3% de femmes au sein de notre parlement en 2016.

avec une femme ministre au gouvernement, le Liban detient la pire des notes concernant la participation politique des femmes. la 143eme  place sur les 144 en ce qui concerne la participation politique.

Hier la coalition nationale pour les femmes en politique qui rassemble les ONGs, les activitistes et des entites etatiques qui ont pour mission l’avancee des droits des femmes, a hausse le ton.

les femmes libanaises sont pretes au combat, difficile certe, sans quota ou mesure positive de discrimination, mais pretes a s’allier et a se presenter aux elections .

en France dans le meme temps, une progression nette de 12 points pour les femmes dans l’Assemblee est soulignee par le Haut Conseil a l’Egalite.

une avancee de ” 12 points a été permise par l’effet conjugué des contraintes – loi sur le non cumul des mandats et doublement des pénalités financières pour les partis ne respectant pas la parité des candidatures – et l’objectif affiché de parité de la part du parti de la majorité présidentielle, arrivé largement en tête lors de ce second tour des élections législatives.”

Je ne peux que souhaiter a toutes mes amies partisanes au Liban , un combat difficile certe, de bien etre placee dans les listes des prochaines elections, et dans des circonscriptions ou elles peuvent gagner aussi.

en citant le Haut conseil a l’Egalite, je rappelle que ” la parité n’est plus une option mais une exigence démocratique. “

 

Rita Chemaly

 

 

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Eager to tell you about the MOOC  on Gender Based violence in the context of migration!

The course will begin on May 15!

what is a MOOC? a MOOC is Massive Online Open Course , that is offered for free by the Global Campus of Human Rights coordinated by the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC).

The Mooc addresses gender, migration, and Human rights studies. The Lecture I participate in, is related to gender based violence faced by migrants and asylum seeking girls in the MENA region. The Political Sciences Institute (ISP) of Saint Joseph University part of the Arab Master in Democracy and Human Rights,  has worked hard while dedicating a team to gather data, prepare, review, shoot, edit and produce the MOOC on GBV addressed by migrants girls and women in the region.  Examples for this specific lecture are taken from the newest published reports in the region related to GBV and SGBV.  Sexual Exploitation, trafficking  Statelessness, Child Marriage, Schooling and access to education are presented. Also main International Instruments addressing GBV are presented.

The MOOC is a free course of 5 hours per week, for 6 weeks, that is open to “upper year undergraduates; postgraduates; NGO activists and practitioners interested in interdisciplinary human rights, gender equality, women’s empowerment, migration; young lawyers and social scientists; active and motivated citizens from around the world.”

I am very excited to be part of this Global Campus MOOC, and to have prepared the first MOOC addressing GBV and women’s rights in the region. Can’t thank enough the team who helped put all the lecture together (ISP team you rock! )  as well as the friends who helped gather the latest information in a very short deadline. (Special thanks to Ghida, Hayat, Raghda, Zeina, Myriam, and special thanks to Jihad who filmed and edited the lecture ).

Stay tuned  and follow the link to participate and enroll  in the MOOC! https://www.eiuc.org/education/global-campus-mooc-gbv-migration.html 

In solidarity from Lebanon

Let us address GBV in our region and internationally with sustainable solutions!

Rita Chemaly

 

 

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to all who might interested, kindly find below the KIP /AUB call for proposals and abstracts related to discrimination and sexual harassment.

You can propose before October 30 2016: In one of the following categories:

A.    Scholarly Research: Proposal to present the findings of a research study

B.    Expert Panel Debate:  Proposal to bring together a small group of experts to debate a central question

C.    Conference Sub-theme Track: Proposal to organize your own track (i.e., a series of connected sessions) around a key question

D.    Training Workshops: Proposal to organize a skill-based training workshop

full details are in the link sent below  http://thekipproject.info/call-for-abstracts/.

Good Luck and in Solidarity

Rita Chemaly

 

below is the mail I received from KIP project Director:

 

 

Dear KIP Community,

 

In preparation for the KIP multi-disciplinary conference that will be taking place on March 31st and April 1st, 2017 at the Olayan School of Business, we are happy to announce our Call for Abstracts and Proposals focused on examining issues pertaining to Discrimination and Sexual Harassment in relation to gender and sexuality within the context of Lebanon.

 

The two-day conference aims at bringing together activists, students, academics, private and public sector representatives, international organization representatives, donors as well as interested members from the general public to discuss and debate multiple formulations and manifestations of sexual harassment and discrimination and chart paths and processes for advocacy, policy recommendations and change at the organizational, community and societal levels.

 

Throughout the conference, we hope to generate recommendations for policies, practices and theory that are informed by multiple local perspectives and that provide momentum for specific ways through which we can support each other in the implementation of positive change forward.

 

Based on this, the attached call invites local and international candidates across sectors and disciplines to submit proposals or abstracts by October 30, 2016 falling under one of the following four below categories:

 

A.    Scholarly Research: Proposal to present the findings of a research study

B.    Expert Panel Debate:  Proposal to bring together a small group of experts to debate a central question

C.    Conference Sub-theme Track: Proposal to organize your own track (i.e., a series of connected sessions) around a key question

D.    Training Workshops: Proposal to organize a skill-based training workshop

 

Please see full details in the Call for Abstracts and Proposals attached. The guidelines for submissions are available on the KIP website http://thekipproject.info/call-for-abstracts/.

 

It would be great if you would consider submitting and, if possible, circulating widely among your networks.

 

with best wishes

Charlotte

 

 

 

 

 

Charlotte M. Karam, PhD

Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior

Associate Dean of Programs

Director of the KIP Project
Olayan School of Business

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American University of Beirut

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Wonderful and amazing Video on gender equality by IWSAW-LAU, about the inequality facing women in Lebanon, and how decision makers are not considering the women voices!

The video, and the Lyrics are just great! by a simple cartoon they tackle GBV,  it tackles women stereotyping and the fact that law makers are not discussing women issues and rights with Women!!

I loved also  how they say that law makers prepare laws and forget them and Loose them in the drawers!!!

I remember that since 2011 many law amendments were presented to the Parliament in Lebanon regarding equality, and till now, LAWS were not Discussed !!! or Voted for….

MPs, did where , in which drawer did you hide those laws amendments?!!

Hat off IWSAW team!!!

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