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Posts Tagged ‘municipal council members’

*Updated infographic with the numbers of AKKAR and the numbers of candidates in Lebanon .(June 2 2016)

I am pleased to share with you , the beautiful Info graphic Map that was posted on NCLW Facebook page.  NCLW clarifies that this Map is indicative, and still need to add to it the results of Akkar. The aim of this map is to help visualise and understand the trends related to women participation in local governance (MUNICIPAL COUNCILS)  and have a pre-look at  the results while waiting for the official data on the number of winning women by the Ministry of Interior.

preliminary results show that in 2016,  599 women won in the Municipal Elections, whereas in 2010 520 women won.

as for candidates the counting shows that in 2016 1342 women were candidate in comparison in 2010: 1080 women were candidate.

the number is small , to compare, but I am sure that many factors might be interesting to analyse to see why women didn’t win more seats.

Presentation1 ELECTIONS

599 women won seats in Lebanese municipalities , 1342 were candidates in 2016

” As Data is key to lessons, NCLW team has worked on the documents related to the results of Municipal Elections of 2016 published by the Ministry of interior. The NCLW team has counted the number of women who won and the names of the women who didn’t in each Kada’. This basic counting is based on the name of the candidate, whether it is a name for a women or a men. Notice1 : the uncertain names were not counted in the results of 2016!

Notice 2: Akkar Results are not counted in these numbers, NCLW Team is waiting for their release by the ministry of Interior. This Infographic will be updated as soon as NCLW Team count the Akkar women Candidates * (this was done and new info is above)v 

Also, and based on CEDAW report , a comparison with the Municipal Elections of 2010 numbers is possible. NCLW Social Media Team is happy to share with you this in house created Infographic! while waiting for the official results , Congrats to Each Women who Won a Seat in a Municipality!”

 

Youpiii!!!!

Rita Chemaly

 

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Achkout Municipal Council 2016 one Women on board Rita Chemaly

ACHKOUT Results for the Municipal Council 2016 Elections . Source Elections.gov.lb

Youpiii!!! The Ministry of Interior in Lebanon is doing great in Publishing Online the results of the elections of the municipal councils in Lebanon!!

 

I am sooo happy to be able to access such information!

Yippee!! It will be better if for the directorates other than Beirut we can have the results by Kalam and Ghouraf. It is needed to see how voters voted, to whom, was it different if they are women and men, (Gender segregated data and even as we have them communities segregated data!)  and what was the “abstentions”  numbers in each kalam /ghouraf!

Here is a sneak peak from the elections, of my beloved  Home Town Achkout! Yeyyy!!!!

Numbers and stats will mean something soon!!! Access to information is Important in the state of Law!

Rita Chemaly

I’m waiting for the Chouf results !!! hurry hurry in uploading them!

Elections results in Lebanon Rita Chemaly

 

 

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The National Commission for Lebanese Women, that is a National machinery affiliated to the Presidency of the Council of Ministers , has prepared a Draft law aiming at Helping Women to be Candidates and Win the elections for the municipalities.

The municipalities elections in Lebanon are a family and neighbors issue. The Women who want to be candidate needs to be registered as a condition in the registry of the Municipality. “sejjel kayd”.

The discrimination appears in article 25, of the current Municipality law, in which a Women will loose all her links to the family, and networks that she has created in her municipality of origins ” sejil kaydiha el assassi”  if she gets married, as she is directly and without asking taken down from the registry of origin and enlisted in the registry of her “Husband”.

For me, it is a PATRIARCHAL SOCIETY in which a Women is the PROPRIETY of her FATHER until Marriage, after MARRIAGE, SHE IS THE PROPRIETY OF HER HUSBAND;

regardless my point of view of how the laws in LEBANON discriminate against women in the texts and make her directly affiliated to a MAN (the father or husband) , the new draft law is  a new step forward for women’s rights in Lebanon. this is done through this draft law amendment registered at the Parliament by the Active MP Ghassan Mukahiber, on the 11/4/2016 under registry number 168/2016,

as a Practical example, I as a married women from Achkout/Kesrwan , can be candidate after my marriage in Achkout if I wish ! Because in the Municipality of my Husband which is Deir Dourit/Chouf, no one have ever heard of me! 🙂 unlike Achkout, where all my activism, links, are tight 🙂

apart from this personal example, and for this,

 I am now asking ALL MPS (the reconducted oops! ) (another polemique here hein? ) to LEGIFERATE and VOTE and ratify this NEW amendment PRIOR TO THE 2016 MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS!

WE AS WOMEN need IT!!!!  WE still fight for our rights in municipalities : a change of the law is a must!

Rita Chemaly

here is the text of the law amendment as presented to the parliament by Ghassan Mokhaiber.

here is the link to the Press release covered by our National News Agency! http://nna-leb.gov.lb/ar/show-news/216377/ 

 

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Beirut – In recent days, the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli has been the site of highly publicised clashes between diverse political and sectarian groups. However while this small minority battles, the majority of Lebanese citizens are standing up against violence – both online and on the ground.
Soon after the clashes began, Lebanese civil society activists condemned the spread of violence through Facebook, Twitter and blogs. Their calls for national unity and to disarm the city circulated online in record time. Building on this public support, activists created new social media pages – many of which gathered over a thousand members.
These ordinary Lebanese citizens are standing up to show that they reject violence, that they are organising to stop it and that, ultimately, they refuse to be silent.
The Facebook group “Tripoli without weapons!” posted an appeal to local and national authorities that read, “. . . We are citizens who condemn the proliferation of weapons in the neighbourhoods and streets of our city Tripoli. We implore the state and all political, executive, security and military authorities to take whatever steps necessary to rid Tripoli of the weapons circulating through it. Yes to a weapon-free Tripoli! “.
Following this appeal, many key individuals declared a city-wide strike to protest the violence that had claimed several lives, and held a demonstration in front of Tripoli’s public administration offices to raise awareness of their cause.
Demonstrators waved Lebanese flags, sang the national anthem and demanded an immediate response to the city’s problems of rampant poverty and a lack of security, which are seen as interrelated. They called on the state to provide better security and reiterated the need for street militias to disarm. The non-violent protest brought together the President of the Municipal Council, members of parliament from the region, as well as leaders from all faith groups and other members of civil society. Their message was clear: Lebanon needs to return to the rule of law and provide security for all, throughout the country.
With the sectarian strife dividing Tripoli, and fearing that the country as a whole is heading once more towards violence, other civil society activists responded quickly through multiple initiatives, this time in Beirut. Online, youth showed their patriotism with pictures they created in response to the situation, with captions that read: “Neither Sunni nor Shiite, nor Christian, nor Druze, but Lebanese.”
“Our union is our salvation” was another slogan activists displayed on the steps of the National Museum in Beirut, where white chairs with the names of victims of the recent violence, unnamed chairs with Lebanese flags, and a large sign reading “That’s enough!” all begged for a return to peace.
In addition, scholars formed online groups to say no to war in Lebanon. The Third Voice for Lebanon is one example of a non-partisan, non-denominational and apolitical grassroots online group which publishes and circulates texts that protest violence and cronyism, as well as the recruitment and the indoctrination of children into militias and extremist groups. It uses peaceful demonstrations in Lebanon and overseas to say no to violence and yes to peace.
Lebanese civil society is calling upon the state to take firm action against violence and the circulation of weapons in poor areas by establishing security and supporting sustainable development that can help end the poverty that drives violence. The hurdles Lebanon faces now are very real. But these collective actions by Lebanon’s diverse, multifaceted civil society demonstrate hope.
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* Rita Chemaly is a writer and researcher in social and political science and author of the book Spring 2005 in Lebanon, between Myth and Reality. She won the Samir Kassir Award for Freedom of the Press in 2007 and blogs at www.ritachemaly.wordpress.com. This article was written for the Common Ground News Service (CGNews).
Source: Common Ground News Service (CGNews), 26 June 2012, http://www.commongroundnews.org/article.php?id=31597&lan=en&sp=0

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