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Oxfam is committed to working with others to find lasting solutions to poverty and injustice. We have a conviction that people are capable of building a livelihood without poverty on their own, once given the chance to do so.

Oxfam has been working in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region for over five decades and over the past four decades promoting gender equality and supporting women’s right to participate and be represented in governance and decision-making structures and processes.

This focus is complementary to other areas of Oxfam’s work on women’s rights and to the broader goal of Oxfam to contribute to a ‘world without poverty.’ Oxfam is committed to supporting women, men and children living in poverty, to claim their rights to sustainable livelihoods, to basic social services, to life and security, to be heard, and to an identity.

AMAL is a three-year multi-country programme to be implemented jointly by Oxfam Great Britain, Oxfam Novib, Intermon Oxfam and partners, which is aimed to promote active participation and leadership of women in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, including the poorest and most marginalised women, in local, national and regional governance structures and decision-making processes, thereby ensuring that they have a say in formulation of and/or their needs and priorities are reflected in socio-economic policies and practice affecting them at all levels. The programme is set to be implemented in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Morocco, Tunisia and Yemen. In this framework Oxfam is recruiting for a:

National Vacancy

Regional Advocacy and Media Officer

Full time position

Based in Beirut, Lebanon (may move to   Cairo, Egypt in the course of the project)

One year fixed term national contract with possibility of renewal

Purpose of the function

Main role to lead the AMAL program regional advocacy campaign based on regional research to be conducted in the first year of the project on women’s leadership and political participation. To analyse relevant developments in the national/regional political and economic context. With regard to campaigning and/or lobby agendas, to identify external (national, regional and when relevant global) decision-makers to press to adopt and implement the policy positions of Oxfam and partners. To establish and maintain regular contact with these key regional players/ decision makers. To assist/advise partner organizations in developing their lobby, advocacy and campaigning activities. To oversee the media work with 2 regional partners.

The function

In close co-operation with the Oxfam AMAL program team staff and regional counterparts and on the basis of the research on womens political participation conducted in the first year of the program, you will lead on the formulation and implementation of the AMAL program lobby, advocacy and media strategy, including as needed the development of advocacy and media materials (policy lines, talking points, reports, papers, letters, flyers, press releases, stories.) You report to the Regional Gender Lead of Oxfam Novib, with matrix management by the Programme Coordinator. You are a member of the AMAL program management team for the region.

You will identify key issues and opportunities for lobby and campaigning. You ensure that all media and advocacy statements are signed off in accordance with agreed Oxfam procedures prior to publication. You will liaise with the Oxfam reams in Yemen, OPT, Tunisia and Morocco in this regard.

You will lead as part of the regional advocacy campaign of the AMAL in producing 2 policy briefs/reports focusing on the women’s rights and policies in the MENA region to share with policy decision makers at global regional levels. Throughout the AMAL programme you will identify women change agents and develop stories on these women for wider dissemination.

You will maintain contact with Oxfam staff and local partner organisations in relation to development of Oxfam policy, advocacy and media work in relation to the AMAL program . You are responsible for identifying, organising, facilitating and if needed monitoring of capacity building strategies on media and advocacy target beneficiaries and partners. The partners will receive on the job training on development of advocacy strategies and most importantly lead on research on gaining women’s perception and aspirations in rural areas to inform their sub-nation and national media and advocacy campaigns targeting national, regional and global institutions and authorities.

You identify partner needs in the area of advocacy, lobby and media, and develop programs reinforcing lobby and media activities and you ensure that the activities are in line with Oxfam Southern campaigning principles.

You facilitate the networking between partners and relevant external actors including knowledge & research institutes in relation to policy, advocacy and media, and initiate and facilitate reports and any publications in this area. You will support partners to be linked together via an interactive community of practice, linked to Face-book and Twitter, where organisations can upload videos and pictures, share news, chat and network. During years two and three of the programme implementation, in collaboration with country teams, you will pilot an innovative virtual ‘e-twinning programme’, which will link women’s organisations in the region that are in different stages of development.

You will contribute to raising the voice of women activists from around the region, by facilitating delegations of women to key targets and decision makers in the UK governments, and EU. In Europe partner organizations will link up with NGOs such as WIDE to facilitate and accompany the missions. You will facilitate the delegations and be responsible to develop and agree key messages regarding women’s socio, economic and political rights.

During year three, together with two regional partner organizations you will implement a campaign on the identified policy issue that advocates for women’s rights and agree with all countries on the priorities and the brand of the campaign.

You have Completed an academic degree in political science, development studies, sociology, communication or related field;Demonstrable recent and substantial work experience with NGOs in the Middle East in Maghreb, experience in capacity building with NGOs is an asset;Experience in policy, advocacy, campaigning and media/communications work at local, national and international levels;Familiarity with and previous experience with working with social media.Gender development and/or women’s right background;Ability to influence others, excellent social skills and a team player;Experience of working in insecure environments and adhering to security protocol Experience of working in a multicultural team environment with both national/global staff Knowledge of and sensitivity to conservative Islamic cultures is a distinct advantage High level of flexibility with the ability to produce creative and pragmatic solutions to complex/ambiguous operational problems Excellent communication skills in English; fluency in written/spoken Arabic and in spoken/written French.Readiness to undertake regular travel to offices in the field Applicants must be legally entitled to work in Lebanon.

We offer

A competitive, fair pay and benefits package that is justifiable to our donors. This position will be a national contract, recruited primarily in the Middle East and North Africa region.

Application procedure

Are you interested? Send your application in writing, including a motivation letter and a curriculum vitae and mentioning reference number 5-159 to jobs@oxfamnovib.nl to the attention of Ewa van den Berg, HR Consultant of Oxfam Novib, no later than October 30, 2012.

Information on the job is available with Mirjam Andriessen +31 6 10973441 of Oxfam Novib. Information on the contract and procedure is available with Mrs Natalia Arkhipova of Oxfam Great Britain at: NArkhipova@oxfam.org.uk

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Job Reference no.
INT5764
Region
Middle East, Eastern Europe and CIS
Location
Beirut
Division
International
Department
Position Type
Fixed Term
Job Type
Experienced
Closing date for applications
(UK Time)
16 October 2012

MEAL Officer

 

LOCATION: Beirut
JOB FAMILY: Programme
SALARY: $Competitive
LEVEL: D1 National

OXFAM PURPOSE: To work with others to find lasting solutions to poverty and suffering.
TEAM PURPOSE: To work as part of the AMAL programme management team to effectively deliver the AMAL programme for maximum benefit for women in the Middle East and North Africa region.

JOB PURPOSE: To lead and support the development and implementation of effective and coordinated MEAL systems for the AMAL programme to support quality delivery as per Oxfam standards.

For more information about Oxfam’s work in the Middle East, please visit our website.

 

Background

 

Oxfam has been working in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region for over five decades. Over the past four decades it has been promoting gender equality and supporting women’s right to participate and be represented in governance and decision-making structures and processes.

This focus is complementary to other areas of Oxfam’s work on women’s rights and to the broader goal of Oxfam to contribute to a ‘world without poverty.’ Oxfam is committed to supporting women, men and children, living in poverty, to claim their rights to sustainable livelihoods, to basic social services, to life and security, to be heard, and to an identity.

AMAL is a three-year multi-country programme to be implemented jointly by Oxfam GB, Oxfam Novib, Intermon Oxfam and partners. It is aimed to promote active participation and leadership of women in the MENA region, including the poorest and most marginalised women, in local, national and regional governance structures and decision-making processes. By doing so, the programme aims to ensure that they have a say in formulation and/or their needs and priorities are reflected in socio-economic policies and practice at all levels. The programme is set to be implemented in the OPTs, Morocco, Tunisia and Yemen.

 

Key Responsibilities

 

  • To develop programme MEAL systems in accordance with Oxfam standards
  • To ensure relevant Oxfam team, partners, target groups and community capacity building and participation in MEAL
  • To provide analysis and presentation of MEAL data

 

For more details, please read the attached job profile (below).

 

Skills and Competence

 

Essential

  • Knowledge and experience of establishing and maintaining effective monitoring and evaluation systems for development projects
  • Experience of gathering, analysing and presenting quantitative and qualitative data
  • Proven ability to work effectively with others – strong interpersonal skills
  • Excellent facilitation and training skills
  • Good organisational skills including accuracy, consistency, attention to detail and patience
  • Ability to show perseverance, tenacity and the ability to work under pressure
  • A strong focus on results – sets goals, plans and prioritises effectively, monitors quality and progress of work against plans, establishes high level of performance and sets an example to others
  • Demonstrable understanding of gender and rights based approaches to development
  • Experience of using participatory approaches in development projects
  • Able to communicate effectively in written and spoken English and Arabic
  • Commitment to Oxfam’s values

Desirable

  • Previous experience with Oxfam
  • Previous experience of working on projects related to women’s empowerment
  • Ability to speak French

Other

  • Ability to travel extensively in the region

How to Apply

For a more detailed overview of the role, please read the attached job profile.
Applications must be submitted online via the link below, by Tuesday 16th October 2012.

Applying for a job? Here is a guide to help you make the most out of the application process.

Vous souhaitez postuler à une offre d’emploi ? Ce guide vous aidera à maximiser vos chances. .

 

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Terms of Reference

Consultancy for the visioning exercise of the men’s forum and Steering Committee for the project

“Promoting Working with men and boys to end Violence against Women in the Middle East”

in Jordan, oPt and North Iraq

 

1. Programme background

 

The growing global debate on the role of men in promoting gender equality pursued Oxfam GB to explore this area, due to the tremendous work of the organization in promoting gender equality, in particular addressing the structural barriers to women’s development, in particular violence against women. Accordingly, since 2008 Oxfam started a regional programme with the aim of engaging men in ending violence against women. The key programme components included: 1) capacity building of women’s organizations that are engaged in ending VAW; either service providers for women’s survivors of violence or as actors in empowering women to speak up on violence; 2) research component that analysed masculinity; and 3) promoting the role of men as key actors in ending violence against women by establishing a men’s forum and launching White Ribbon Campaign.  At the pilot phase 2008-2011, the programme was implemented in Lebanon, and leveraged the learning, in particular the capacity building component to other countries in the region including Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Egypt, Syria and Yemen. A men’s forum was established in Baalbeck, Lebanon conducting different awareness raising sessions at the community level. During the course of the pilot phase implementation, in order to promote the approach of working with men to end violence against women; Oxfam encouraged the partner in Lebanon engaged in the implementation to establish Steering Committee from various stakeholders. The final evaluation of the programme, informed the need for moving the Steering Committee mandate from being a project driven to encompass a group of stakeholders that are interested to work around the approach of working with men and boys to end violence against women.

 

Based on the success model of the pilot phase, in January 2011, Oxfam started the implementation of Phase II of the programme, in partnership with national CSOs in the region. Phase II is funded by the European Union (EU) for the period 2011-2013.  The overall project objective is to contribute to the efforts of civil society organizations in the Middle East in countering gender stereotypes to combat the root causes of Violence against Women with the specific objective of improvement in the attitudes and practices of men and government policies to end VAW in the Middle East, specifically in Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan and Palestine. Major components of this project include the establishment of the men’s forum and the enhancement of the coordination and networking among organizations and relevant stakeholders through the formations of Steering Committee in each country where the programme is implemented.

 

In Lebanon, KAFA began to support community-based organisations to establish a men’s forum in Baalbek, a work that has been started in Lebanon during the pilot phase of the project of working with men and boys to EVAW back in 2009. During the first phase, Oxfam GB supported and funded activities at universities, among farmers, religious leaders and youth that focused on various interests of men in different groups, but also included violence against women.  It is expected that 50 enlightened men from the four targeted countries will form the men’s forums and will deliver their priority action plan for change. Based on the lessons learned working with men’s forum inBaalbeck, there is a necessity to conduct a vision building exercise with the members of new forums in order to: Define the purpose and the mandate of the forum, which will result in production of ToRs for the forum with clearly defined roles and responsibilities; Establish transparent and accountable governance system; and Development of by-laws for the forum

Simultaneously, and  in order to sustain the Steering Committee network, Oxfam believes that there is a need for a visioning exercise, similar to the one launched with the partner in Lebanon; among the Steering Committees formed in Jordan, Iraq and Palestine.

 

It is therefore, and based on the above, that Oxfam decided to recruit a consultant to support the men’s forum and the steering committees in Jordan, oPt and North Iraq to reflect on their major future role thru a visioning exercise.

 

 

2. Objective of the consultancy:

 

The overall objective of the consultancy is to explore the functions of the steering committees and the men’s forum in the three countries being established by partners and lead a process of a visioning exercise that would inform the mission and the entity of the men’s forum and steering committee in each country. This exercise will aim at sustaining the Steering Committees and the men’s forum Structures beyond the programme cycle.

 

 

3. Tasks to be performed:

 

● Review existing role of the men’s forum and the steering committee in Lebanon and its scope of work.

● Prepare the materials for the visioning exercise for the members of the men’s forum and the steering committee in Jordan, oPt and North Iraq including a clear understanding on the approach of working with men and boys.

● Conduct a two to three days visioning exercise in each of the targeted countries (Jordan, oPt and Iraq) including the development of the mandate of the men’s forum, their role, Action plan, criteria for joining the men’s forum, KPI,…

● Conduct a one day visioning exercise with the steering committee members in each of the targeted countries (Jordan, oPt and Iraq) including the development of the mandate of the steering committee, their role, …

● Provide an output report to Oxfam GB including a clear mandate of the men’s forum and the steering committees and clear recommendations.

 

4. Timeline:

 

 

The following table indicates approximate timings for the assessment to be completed.

 

Action

By   When

Who

Review   of men’s forum activities and scope of work in Lebanon 15 October 2012 Consultant
Preparation   for the visioning exercise 17 October 2012 Consultant
Review   the materials with Consultant 16 October 2012 Consultant,   Oxfam GB
Visioning   exercise with the men’s forum in Jordan 21-22-23 October 2012 Consultant
Visioning   exercise with the men’s forum in North Iraq 25-26-27 October 2012 Consultant
Visioning   exercise with the men’s forum in oPt 29-30-31 October 2012 Consultant
Report   submission to Oxfam GB with recommendations 10 November 2012 Consultant

 

 

5. Qualifications and required skills:

 

Oxfam is looking for consultants with strong presentation, analytical and facilitation skills to conduct the visioning exercise with the members of the men’s forum and the steering committee in each of the targeted countries (oPt, Jordan and North Iraq).  The consultants should have the following skills and competencies:

 

● Demonstrable experience of facilitation skills.

● Experience in conducting visioning exercise.

● Strong background and expertise in Gender and Violence against Women issues.

● Strong Analytical and writing skills.

● Computer literate.

● Committed to deadlines.

● Ability to write concise, readable and analytical reports.

● Experience working in the Middle East and knowledge of each targeted country context.

● Excellent writing and verbal communication skills in Arabic.

 

6. Remuneration:

 

The remuneration is commensurate with skills and competences of the selected applicant/s. Oxfam will pay a total fee of 9,500 USD  -11,000 USD for the overall assessment including all expenses (Travel, accommodation, transportation, consultancy fee, …) based on satisfactory completion of the job.

 

7. Applications

 

Applicants with the experience and skills described above are invited to submit the below:

1. CV including contactable three references.

2. A cover letter of no more than 2 pages introducing the consultant experience and how the skills and competencies described above are met, with concrete examples. Please also use this cover letter to indicate consultants’ availability at critical periods.

3. An outline of no more than 2 pages of the proposed process and key considerations.

4. A 1-page budget covering all major anticipated costs (Oxfam prefers to pay an agreed price for the totality of the work including the field trips to North Iraq)

5. One example of a previous similar task.

 

Applicants not conforming to this model may be rejected. Applicants should be emailed to rabisaad@oxfam.org.uk by October 10,2012.

 

8. Technical evaluation

 

The quality of each technical offer will be evaluated in accordance with the award criteria and the associated weighting as detailed in the evaluation grid below.

No Criteria Max Score
1 Methodology

– Marks will be awarded for clarity, credibility, innovation and “achievability”

40
2 Quality of personnel/consultant

– Assessed against the skills, competencies and experience specified

30
4 Commitment to availability in the critical periods. 10
5

 

 

Commercial

– Fees commensurate with skills/experience

– Quoted expenses reasonable/realistic to deliver outputs

– Terms and conditions

20
Total 100

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Un article de Elham Manea, politologue Yemenite a l’institut des sciences politiques de l’universite de Zurich, dans lequel elle retrace les changements survenus dans les relations tribales au Yemen.

 

Un  article qui a été publie dans le Daily Star Libanais le 6 avril 2012

rita chemaly

Tribalism in Yemen has changed deeply

February’s presidential election in Yemen by no means marks the end of the country’s troubles. However, the suggestion that the United States host a new arrangement based on decentralized negotiation between tribal and regional leaders is not the way to solve them.

Such a call ignores lessons from Yemen’s past and underestimates the deep changes that have taken place in Yemeni society over the last decades. Although the tribal system continues to operate as the prevalent mode of social organization, it is crucial to recognize that the nature of tribal networks and institutions has changed drastically.

Historically, tribal networks compensated for the state’s lack of capacity. The tribe assumed the role of protector and provider: securing tribal territory, protecting water wells, and resolving conflicts between its members or with other tribes. In many ways, the tribe was the institution of first resort for financial backing and social support in times of crisis. It is perhaps very telling that Aden – where the nuclear family has displaced the tribe as the main social unit – is more affected by poverty than regions that have preserved tribalism, such as Shabwah, Mahra and Al-Dali.

Tribal sheikhs were also once accountable to their constituents: They were elected and could be voted out. Thus, a sheikh was often regarded as a first among equals, rather than an absolute ruler. Custom (Irf) governed the mediation of conflict within or outside the tribe and could not be violated without loss of honor – a distinct disgrace – and threat of severe penalty.

However, the calculated politics of patronage applied by the former Yemeni president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, changed the nature of the relationship between tribal leaders and their constituencies. Saleh and the sheikhs had a number of incentives to engage in a new relationship. From the regime’s perspective, offering assistance to warring or otherwise weakened tribes undercut potentially strong alliances against it, and by incorporating tribal forms of arbitration, the regime also depleted tribal resources that could be used in opposition to the state. On the other side of the bargain, this patronage system afforded sheikhs freedom from accountability to their constituencies.

By successfully co-opting these leaders and rendering them dependent on Sanaa for privileges and largesse, Saleh’s patronage system eroded tribal codes and norms – ultimately leading to a leadership vacuum. Many sheikhs today are dramatically wealthier than their fellow tribesmen – and thus no longer dependent on their constituencies. More tribesmen are alienated from their leaders – who often take up residence in Sanaa and are only just beginning to abuse their power.

The most famous example is the case of the Jaashin area in Ibb, where the sheikh there evicted dozens of families in 2009 after they refused to pay “taxes” – they instead insisted on paying the municipalities directly. Additionally, there are reports of “private” prisons run by sheikhs who use them to intimidate and terrorize their own tribesmen – enough to cause Yemen’s Human Rights Minister Huriyya Mashhour to pledge to shut them down.

Saleh understood this reality belatedly. He mistakenly thought that securing the allegiance of sheikhs would ensure their tribes’ loyalties. But as was revealed in the uprisings that led to his removal from office, many tribe members did not follow the orders of their “leaders.” In this context, it is difficult to imagine how the United States would host a new arrangement based on decentralized negotiation with leaders who can no longer deliver.

Perhaps we should look to the Sultanate of Oman as a source of inspiration – particularly to its strategy used to integrate the region’s tribes and end the Dhofar Rebellion in the 1970s. Oman managed to overcome Dhofar’s isolation by connecting it to Muscat while simultaneously instilling a sense of national identity in its population through three major initiatives.

First, the government pardoned all the Dhofari fighters who were willing to switch sides: Those who accepted amnesty were retrained and incorporated into the armed forces. As a result, hundreds of Dhofari rebels deserted and joined Sultan Qaboos’ “Firqat” Irregulars. These squads ranged in size from 30 to 100 men, the majority of which were defected rebels and local tribesmen trained to operate as a paramilitary force.

Not only did this strategy help secure the support of the tribes from which members of the Firqat were drawn, but it also built up the squads as provisional regional governments, which may have helped rebuild trust in the central government. At the very least, this was a clear departure from previous policies of dispatching regular forces composed mostly of Pakistani soldiers.

The tribal factor was also especially important in Oman’s efforts to create an administrative network in the region and to ensure the allegiance of both tribal leaders and local people. Like the rest of the country at the time, Dhofar lacked a basic civil service. Starting in 1974, the new sultan set up several ministries to run Dhofar’s public affairs. And although the heads of these ministries lived in Muscat, local branches were set up for each, and their representatives were usually elected – rather than appointed – tribal leaders.

By addressing the economic and social demands and grievances of the population of Dhofar, the state aimed to undermine the very basis of the rebels’ cause. Between 1971 and 1975 the Omani government used generous funding from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to allocate 25 percent of the nation’s development budget to Dhofar alone and provide for the construction of local roads, airports, schools, clinics, and power stations. While promising to make the province economically self-sufficient by 1980, the overarching objective of the program was, however, to instill “pride in the community and a spirit of nation-building.” These efforts both appeased the Dhofari population and strengthened the connection between the center and the periphery.

All of this would not have been possible had the state been absent from the equation. The state is very much key to any attempt to solve Yemen’s problems, and hitherto has been hampered by weakness and corruption stemming from the rule of a single clan – one more interested in filling its coffers than addressing the needs of its population. But for this, we should not blame the state: Blame instead the leaders – and get to work.

Elham Manea is an associate professor at Zurich University’s Institute of Political Science. She specializes in Yemeni affairs and is the author of “Regional Politics in the Gulf” and “The Arab State and Women’s Rights: The Trap of Authoritarian Governance.” This commentary first appeared at Sada, an online journal published by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/Opinion/Commentary/2012/Apr-06/169391-tribalism-in-yemen-has-changed-deeply.ashx#ixzz1sYwdmhu1

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