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Posts Tagged ‘citizenship rights’

I am enraged, those 2 days, all what TVs and media are covering are the supposed military attacks USA, France and Great Britain might do against Syria.

And since than, all the messages I am getting are “keep safe” “we will suspend our meetings” “stay home” ….

What??? I know that my post is just for me and wont be read by the BIG guys, but maybe if some of their team members may read it, they will understand, that some people who are “citizens” here in this part of the world are AGAINST any military attack!!! Syria is already living under the bombs, bombing more and letting foreign powers intervene as they did in Irak, Afghanistan, Libya or else, is a huge Mistake. Can they consider the citizens that are living in the region?? can they consider that if it didn’t work in other parts of the world, it won’t work in Syria too?!!!

I am afraid, Yes I am, for the security of those who are still living in Syria, for those who are living like me in Lebanon, and trying to make a living albeit the bombings and explosions we are witnessing!

Dear Big Guys, the Soft politic is in my opinion the solution, the political solution is still needed as it happened in Lebanon in 1989, and after in Doha….

Please dears think about it!! Syria is already a war-torn country and chemical weapons is already been used, don’t “add oil to the fire” and use a military attack, even those who you think needs you for a military attack are not as clean as they should be ! Fundamentalism, extremism, and dictatorship are all for me, simple citizen of this Middle East unacceptable!

Rita Chemaly

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On Friday, a General Assembly for Lebanese Women Married to non-nationals ( french, american, syrian, canadian, egyptian, palestinian, Spanish, Italian, Chinese….) gathered at the YWCA in Ain El Mreisseh.

The aim of the gathering was to recall the activities, protests, and actions of the Nationality Campaign in Lebanon, and to discuss future actions for 2013.

During the meeting Lebanese women who participated to trainings about leadership and communication, organised by WLP and CRTDA were given “diplomas” by the organisations.

They participated to the training to be able to form a lobby to push forward their right to transmit their citizenship to their children and husbands.

during the ceremony many media representatives were present : LBCI, New TV, Future TV, as well as the presence of a lot of newspapers journalist ( el Diyar, el Moustakbal, ….)

The Women were given also goodies bags… the bag contained : deliciously chocolate wrapped, with a sticker for the car, and the New Nationality Calendar for 2013.

I participate to each year General Assembly, and I feel bad when I see all those women suffering from not being able to share their passport with their children. I am suffering when I see that those women cannot see their children hospitalized or go to school in Lebanese public schools, or in Lebanese free schools. A women told me that this is a Shia ( a muslim sect in Lebanon  her children were accepted in a free school by the nuns, but they were not able to stay there because….they are not considered nationals!! Lebanese!! 😦

 I hope that lebanon will ratify the CEDAW completely without reservations!

I hope that my cousins will be able to come to lebanon without a visa because their father is a french diplomat, I hope that my cousin will be able to stay here and work as a lawyer even if he is lebanese and canadian…..

those are my Wishes for 2013…. Long LIVE THE TABBOULEH AND THE LEBANESE MUMs anD gRAND mOTHERS! 

Rita Chemaly

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The Women’s Right to Nationality Campaign is pleased to introduce the zero issue of its new Nationality Newsletter.

The Nationality Newsletter seeks to highlight key news related to this advocacy campaign.  It also provides regular updates on the campaign’s activities seeking to reform the nationality law in Lebanon.

 

This ad hoc newsletter will also include a regular feature which provides information on important and relevant legal and administrative procedures of interest to Lebanese women married to non-nationals. Each issue will also profile one of the women leaders of the campaign in an effort to recognize the daily struggles of women in Lebanon in seeking justice, equality and an end to discrimination.

 

We hope that this newsletter will contribute to mobilizing more supporters for this just cause and to the recognition to women’s full citizenship rights.

 

To access this issue, kindly click the following link: http://crtda.org.lb/webfm_send/7

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Source: Daily star

BEIRUT: Talk among those in the know suggests that many Lebanese MPs, when asked about the two most irksome issues facing them in Parliament, cite the domestic violence and nationality draft laws.

Lina Abou-Habib, coordinator of the campaign for equal citizenship rights for women, is delighted by the rumor.

“I think it’s an excellent sign,” she says. After years of campaigning on the issue, Abou-Habib is sensing a change in momentum.

“I think something that has happened is that people, and particularly women, have realized it is their right to have rights.”

“That awakening is irreversible,” she adds.

As the law stands, Lebanese women are not entitled to pass their citizenship onto their children, meaning that if they marry a non-Lebanese citizen, they are unable to pass on their nationality, rendering it difficult for their children to receive state benefits such as education and health care.

Campaigners handed a draft law on the issue to Parliament last July, but have yet to receive a response from Prime Minister Najib Mikati. For Abou-Habib, the executive director of CRTD-A, a regional gender-research nongovernmental organization based in Beirut, while legal change is eventually vital, a widespread change in attitudes is more important at this stage.

This is finally beginning to happen now, she believes, thanks to simultaneous efforts from various women’s rights movements, including those speaking out against domestic violence and sexual harassment and nationality campaigners.

“I think women’s organizations have been able to make these issues public issues, but at the same time make them individual issues,” she says.

Women are realizing that “it’s not just bad luck if you happen to be married to a foreigner, and it’s not just bad luck if you are beaten by your husband,” but “that actually it’s a violation of rights.”

Nadine Moawad, a member of Nasawiya, the Lebanese feminist collective, agrees. “Everyone knows it’s an issue. They understand the suffering of people who live here and can’t put their children in public school.”

“There’s a lot of anger and resentment, which is good. I think what we’re seeing here is more important than legal change. This is exactly the definition of active citizenship,” Abou-Habib says.

Now that there has been this gradual change in thinking, on the part of the general public, it is now time for that mentality shift to reach Parliament, Abou-Habib says.

After a protest in late December, 2012 will see the campaigners continue with such civil mobilization, but also begin to lobby every bloc in Parliament, in an effort to garner support for the draft law.

But Abou-Habib believes the time for semantics is over. “I think we’re now beyond explanations, we’re at the level of challenging and making sure it’s on the agenda.”

The process of arranging meetings with parliamentarians can be extremely time consuming, as Abou-Habib says, “It can take you five months to get an appointment with a politician.” However, as she stresses, meeting with campaigners “is not a favor: it his duty. He needs to listen.”

It is vital to meet with every group within Parliament, she says, as “at the end of the day, everybody is failing in being a true democratic decision maker. Everyone is equally failing women. And all their political differences don’t matter. When it comes to the denial of rights, they all converge.”

Leader of the opposition Saad Hariri in January tweeted that he was in full support of the nationality campaign, saying “I am all for women giving the #Lebanese nationality to their children and husbands, I think it’s shameful that we don’t.”

However, Abou-Habib is skeptical saying nationality campaign is usually the last item on the agenda of politicians.

For many, the pervasive hypocrisy among Lebanese politicians on this cause was further exemplified by the announcement late last year that the Cabinet had passed a draft law allowing the descendants of Lebanese fathers or grandfathers to apply for citizenship, even if they themselves had never lived in the country.

For Moawad, “This was the final straw. It really became obvious that it’s not an issue of population or a sectarian issue,” as politicians insisted for so long, she says.

“It’s now strictly a misogynist issue. Lebanese mothers are not recognized as people,” Moawad adds. “I think it’s very simply stripped down to an issue of state misogyny.”

Activists were further incensed when Justice Minister Shakib Qortbawi last month said full nationality rights for women would be “dangerous.”

“This is the minister of justice? I think they should change the name of his post. It should be the minister of discrimination. The minister of inequality, the minister of machismo and sexism,” said Abou-Habib.

However, she insists, “I’m not going to be dispirited by a bigot.”

Campaign leaders met Monday with Labor Minister Charbel Nahhas to discuss last year’s Cabinet decision to issue work permits to the non-Lebanese husbands and children of Lebanese women.

“We wanted to share with him exactly what is happening on the ground, and individual cases where some people are having difficulties.”

“It was a frank discussion, and he showed real concern for citizens and citizens’ rights.”

The major challenges that remain, according to Abou-Habib, are that, primarily, “the people in power … do not take rights seriously, and secondly, that their interests come first. And I think these are very powerful obstacles.”

For Moawad, the nationality campaigners are not going to give up their struggle any time soon, but the final stretch may take some time.

“I don’t know what the campaign could do that it hasn’t done already,” she says. “No draft laws are budging in Parliament, on violence or nationality.”

“Anything short of a whole refurbishment of the entire system of government,” might not be enough to usher in these social reforms, Moawad believes. “I don’t really know what else there is to be done apart from changing the sectarian, corrupt system of government.”

“Maybe all women should go on strike,” she suggests.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Daily Star on February 09, 2012, on page 4.
Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Local-News/2012/Feb-09/162688-nationality-campaigners-vow-to-fight-on-despite-obstacles.ashx#ixzz1lxt2Cry5
(The Daily Star :: Lebanon News :: http://www.dailystar.com.lb)

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